7 reasons to live on campus

Scene from a Loyola University Maryland residence hallSo you’ve heard that Loyola has some of the best residence halls well, anywhere. But amenities aren’t the only reason to live on campus. Consider all of this additional upside:

1) Convenience

You know those days when you wake up only to see it is rainy and cold outside, and you don’t want to get out of bed? Those days will happen, and those are the days you will be glad you live only a short walk to your class. Those are the days where you will want to spend as little time getting to and from class or being outside as possible. The only way to do that is to live on campus.

Or maybe the weather won’t matter much to you, but you forgot a book in your room and you need it for your next class. You’ve only got a few minutes to run to your room and make it to class on time. Living on campus is the way to go.

2) So many friends

Whether you are a first-year or a senior, living on campus guarantees you a social life. It is almost impossible to live on campus and not meet someone who lives on your floor. And we can’t leave out the fact that you live with your peers as roommates as well. Potential new friends literally surround you. Open door policies are a great way to meet new people, and you’ll likely have an RA who holds programs to bring your living community together as well.

3) Experience

This is college. These are the years. You will only have this experience once; don’t let it get away from you. If you’re looking to get the full college experience, living on campus is a huge part that you can’t miss out on. You have the rest of your life to live on your own, but when are you going to live with hundreds of people your same age, with similar interests, and who have the same weird schedule as you?!

4) You don’t have to call the plumber

Submitting a maintenance request and having your problem be solved in a day or two with no extra cost is a beautiful thing. Forget about finding a reliable handy man or plumber to fix your sink before the kitchen floods and then worrying about how much this will cost you. Loyola has got you covered. Seriously, maintenance is there to help you with your problems because we’re college kids so we don’t have all the answers yet. It would be unfair to think that we could really maintain an apartment by ourselves, so we just don’t have to.

5) All Inclusive

When you move out on your own, there are a lot of hidden costs that you probably aren’t thinking about. First you’ve got your electricity, then utilities, cable, and internet … the list goes on and on. When you live on campus all of that goes out the window. You pay for your housing and that is it. Loyola is handing you a big platter of convenience; take it!

6) Independence

Okay, so this may not make much sense following a post about how you’ve got a big platter of convenience in front of you, but just wait. When you live on campus instead of staying at home, you get to experience your first real slice of independence without the overwhelming pile of responsibilities that comes with full-blown adulthood. At Loyola, you’re given the ability to cook for yourself, do your own laundry, manage your own time, go to the FAC when you want (or don’t want), and find a balance that works for you. No more living on a household schedule, this is your time to be independent and find your own style of living.

7) Safety

Loyola has an incredibly safe campus as far as I am concerned. Between our swipe cards/locks on every door of every building and the campus police officers you see patrolling campus 24/7 it is hard not to feel safe. To be frank, this can’t be said for all the neighborhoods around campus where students like to live. But on top of all my other worries about school and friends, I don’t want to worry about not feeling safe where I live. Loyola consistently works to not only make me feel safe, but to truly protect all students from any potential harm. Safety is not something I want to gamble with.

Why You’ll be Happy You Took the Core

Ah, so we have arrived on the topic of the core.

“The core of what?” you ask.

I’m talking about Loyola’s core curriculum. You know, those classes that everyone has to take no matter your major. Some people dread it, other people love it. Either way you’re gonna have to face it, so why not get something positive out of these new areas of study?

When I first heard about the core, my mom was all “wow you’re going to get such a well-rounded education” and I was like “oh yeah totally, I can do this, I can learn everything!” … and then the time came for classes to begin. I was a bit apprehensive once I realized I had to take math, and language, and science — some of the subjects that don’t exactly highlight my skill set. But I realized that I had to trust in the system. Loyola would not have let me come here if they didn’t have faith in me, and the core really does serve a purpose.

You will learn to love this. I promise.

To begin, I’ll point out the obvious. For all students, whether you come to Loyola knowing what your intended major is or you are undecided, the core allows you to explore it all. I took some communications courses and found my major, but I came here set on photography and journalism and I am (happily) studying neither of those today and I have the core to thank. I made it through my math and language courses just fine and then I found a passion with sociology. As I was browsing the course catalog trying to choose a social science course I landed on an intro sociology course focused on societies and institutions. That one course led me to sign up for another sociology course the next semester, and the next thing I knew I was declaring a minor when previously I had no intent to minor in anything. The best part was I didn’t care how practical this course of study might be, or how it would fit in with everything else; the core allowed me to branch out of what I was comfortable with and learn something new about both myself and the world.

Along the same lines, the core can lead you to take out-of-the-ordinary classes that end up being fun. I bet you never thought you’d say school could be fun. But it really can! For one of my theology requirements I wanted to branch out from what I thought I knew, so I took a class on Judaism. I was blown away with how interesting and fascinating this historic religion was; and to think I could have missed out on this if it weren’t for the core.

This is the time when you can take classes that, at first glance, don’t seem to outwardly relate to anything. However, I promise you’ll be pleasantly surprised. You’ll be surprised at how much you didn’t know. You’ll be surprised at how lucky you were to find a new topic that interests you. You’ll be surprised how much you take away from the class and apply it to your main area of study, because you’ll be surprised at how everything really is connected.

The core curriculum seems, to many, as just another requirement, an additional step in getting a degree, maybe even a hassle. But it is so much more than that, all you have to do is give it a chance. The foundation of a Loyola education is the core curriculum; it is the broad and truly well-rounded education you will be receiving over the next four years. The core will both challenge and delight you.

Be open to the core. Embrace it.

The 6 Best Study Spots on Campus

So I hear you want to get some studying done and I’ve got good news for you. If you’re in need of a study spot at Loyola, look no further. After three years here, I’ve successfully scoped out six awesome study spots (listed in no particular order) and now I’m going to share my secret with you!

The first great study spot: YOUR DESK!

Yea, that’s right. I said it. Your desk can be a great study spot but so many people forget about this little piece of furniture that is used as a table more times than it is as a desk.

“Why my desk?” you ask me; well the answer really is simple.

Your desk is conveniently located right in your own room. For some, this may provide distractions based on who else is in your room or how many times you procrastinate by going to the kitchen and opening the fridge. For others though, the fear of wandering around campus only to find any and all potential study spots taken is forevermore banished. You’ve got a clean surface, with easy access to food, water, outlets, all your textbooks, a printer, and comfortable clothing. You don’t have to worry if it is raining or cold outside, so dressing however you like is always an option. Another perk is that you likely have access to a roommate if you’ve got a question that they can answer, just remember to stay on topic and get back to work so you don’t lose your drive. So while the desk may be underrated or often forgotten, dust that thing off and crack open the books. There is work to be done!

Onwards: The Knott Hall and Donnelly Science Center breezeway

View from the Knott Hall/Donnelly Science Center breezeway at Loyola University Maryland

View of the Alumni Memorial Chapel from the Knott Hall/Donnelly Science Center breezeway.

Wait, what’s a breezeway? Well in this case, it’s the series of hallways that connect Knott Hall with Donnelly. You’ll know you’ve arrived when you find yourself looking out the giant windows onto the back of the Alumni Memorial Chapel. Not only are there some great views, but you can usually find a vending machine or two close by, as well as lots of tables and chairs, several computers, and even printers.

Even if the breezeway gets crowded with students studying, you won’t find yourself surrounded by more than 10 people, because seats are limited. Usually, fewer people are a good thing. The natural light is an added bonus that you won’t find if you’re tucked away in Humanities or in a study room in the library.

Half way there: The porch of Humanities!

Admit it: you’re always envious when you see a porch full of students that aren’t you. This is a highly coveted spot for many activities including drinking Starbucks, people watching, and even studying.

Humanities building at Loyola University Maryland

Prime real estate on the Humanities porch.

The upside to studying on the porch is that you get to enjoy the beautiful weather (depending on the time of year of course) while also being productive. No more having to choose between hiding out in your room and lounging on the quad. Instead, pack a bag full of books and grab a chair on the Humanities porch. You’re pretty much guaranteed a good time surrounded by the sounds of happy students enjoying the outdoors and the lovely view of campus that never gets old.

The first three spots are so good, how can there be more? Enter: The Library

Okay so we all know the library is where people go to study for hours on end and pull the all-nighters during finals, but maybe you aren’t one of those library people because it can be a bit intimidating. Well fret not, during the past 2012-13 school year I recently braved the stereotypes of library people and ventured to the other side (i.e., east side) of campus to see what it was all about. I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised! There are tons of great spots in the library to choose from, meaning there is something for everyone. If you like a little background chatter and natural light like myself, grab a few friends and snag a table in the front gallery. If you need a small and quiet space with no visual or auditory distractions, get there early to claim a study room or cubby. Or if you want to lounge a little while soaking in the atmosphere, wander in just about any section and you’ll find a couch or two to plop down on.

Like I said, there is something for everyone so don’t be afraid of the library! My only advice would be if it is midterm or finals week, the earlier you can get there the better because the library can fill up quickly.

Second to last but still great: Starbucks

Starbucks at Loyola University Maryland

Empty over the summer; always packed during the school year.

Wait, Starbucks sees hundreds of students pass by all day, and there are lines during prime coffee drinking hours, why would anyone study here? I’ll tell you why: because it is fun! And you’re always able to fuel up on caffeine. During the day, you’ll be lucky to find a spot whether it is at the Starbucks bar or the long table a few feet away, but if you get one I suggest putting in your headphones and sipping on your beverage of choice to get into the zone. You’re sure to always see a friendly face walk by and wave, which can be a welcome reminder to smile and relax. You’re also close to several options for food as well as bathrooms for the inevitable bathroom break. And of course you can make all the noise you want, this isn’t the library.

Last but not least: The Reading Room

Tucked away on the third floor of Loyola’s Andrew White Student Center is the haven for students looking to nap between classes. But napping is overrated when you wake up disoriented and late for class. So if you want to get comfy, and I mean really comfy, but don’t feel like sitting studying in bed all day, I present to you the Reading Room. The recliners that you can find here are likely sent straight from heaven, and this room may actually be quieter than the library. It ends up becoming the perfect mix between practicality and relaxation. Even if you end up never getting an ounce of studying done here, at least take a power nap just once before you leave.

So there you have it, the six best study spots on campus. I challenge you to try each study spot at least once. But if you find the perfect spot for you, than stick to what you know works. Everyone needs something different, but I can guarantee you’ll find it if you just look.