Unexpected Encounters During Class

I remember the best day in grade school was field trip day. No matter where we were going, I knew that it was going to be an amazing day. It was a chance to get out of the classroom and learn something new, something real. It was a real change of place.

In Rome, I feel like I’m reliving this piece of my childhood.

My professors are enthusiastic about incorporating the history of the Eternal City into our lessons, discussing and analyzing the history, art, and culture of Rome. On top of all of that, our professors like to include site visits as a part of their curriculum…

Continue reading

The Essence of Economics

Loyola, through its community of professors, students, and alumni, allows each individual to partake in a unique academic experience, one that converts theory into reality (and vice versa).

I’m studying economics and history… and I read a book last semester that helps me to articulate the complicated and compelling reality of my academic journey.

In his book Economics: The User’s Guide, Ha-Joon Chang, an American economist, academic scholar, and professor, provides two distinct perspectives through which the broad field of Economics is interpreted, studied, and practiced.

Economics: The User's Guide by Ha-Joon Chang

Continue reading

Behind the scenes: A commuter’s life

1693_loyola_university_maryland_2

Walking across Loyola’s campus on a beautiful day, you’re bound to see many familiar and not-yet-familiar faces. 

But even for those faces you recognize, the mystery of the characters behind them remains: their backgrounds, their goals, their pet peeves, their struggles, their ambitions.

When I walk across campus, I wave hello and engage with my professors and fellow students, and I can’t help but wonder how many of them know…

I’m a commuter student.

Continue reading

#KnowMe

Greetings, all! My name is Vitaliy Nikolaenko. I am sophomore commuter student at Loyola University Maryland. Currently, I am a B.A. candidate in economics and history, a blogger for A Hound’s Life, and a contributing columnist at The Greyhound.

Born and raised in Eastern Ukraine, in the city of Kharkov, I was a boy whose fate was uncertain and whose future established great doubts. 

Years later, I would be sitting before a screen illuminating a dark, dusty study composing a brief introduction about my life’s journey as it occurred (or perhaps, describing the experiences in a more vivid, exaggerated fashion)…  

Continue reading

Lessons from My Sophomore Year

The semester is finally winding down, and my second year at Loyola is coming to an end. I’ve definitely learned a bunch in my classes, but it wouldn’t be a school year at Loyola if I hadn’t learned some life lessons along the way…

While I learned Greek and read Paradise Lost, I learned how to be silent. While I wrote countless research papers and tried to learn physics, I learned patience. I met countless wonderful people and reunited with old friends.

IMG_6179 - 1

So, what have I learned this year that won’t receive a grade?

Continue reading

Exploring Baltimore

I have to admit that it wasn’t until recently that I truly started to take advantage of the multitude of activities and attractions Baltimore offers…

I have been trying to get off campus and find out for myself if the phrase that many of the benches in the city have engraved on them, “Baltimore: Greatest City in America,” is true.

IMG_8803

Now that the warm weather is *officially* here, it seems like the perfect time to do some exploring before I am completely swamped with final exams and end of semester commitments and work.

Continue reading

An Open Letter to All High School Seniors

Euphoria.
Freedom.
Responsibility.
Stress.
Under-prepared.
Torn.
Contemplative.
Excited.
Nervous.
Joy.

These may be some of the emotions you’ve experienced this school year, first as college acceptance letters start to roll in… then as you started visiting campuses… and especially now, as you prepare to make “the big decision” and enroll.

Continue reading

Celebrating Light and Life in Baltimore

We got off the bus, not really knowing what to expect, and as we walked towards the Inner Harbor, we were overwhelmed by the crowd, the music, and the lights.

IMG_8801

My friends and I trekked down to the Harbor for Light City on Thursday night, so we weren’t expecting too many people. It was a school night and a work night, after all. We thought we might bump into some other Loyola students, since it was “Loyola Night.”

To our surprise, there were thousands of people walking around the Inner Harbor enjoying the festival. I’ve never been so happy to see so many people in one place, all celebrating Baltimore…

Continue reading

Taking a Stab at Honoring History

Each year, Loyola’s Classics students celebrate the Ides of March (March 15) by stabbing Julius Caesar on the Quad.

“Hit the brakes… THEY’RE STABBING PEOPLE ON THE QUAD?!”

Well, not quite. We reenact scenes from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar in an attempt to remember this major turning point in Roman sociopolitical history, while also reaching out to the larger Loyola community.

Let me make very clear that no one gets stabbed during this reenactment (although there was a bruised knee this year).

Continue reading

Light City: Celebrating Baltimore through Art, Music, Innovation & Community

Light City is happening in Baltimore next week!

You may have heard about Light City, either by word of mouth or signs on Loyola’s campus. Or if you’re like me, you first saw something advertised on the napkin dispensers in Boulder Cafe and Iggy’s. Greyhounds, keep this on your radar for when you come back from Easter break.

The first large-scale, international light festival in the United States, Light City “will provide a backdrop for the celebration of ideas, ingenuity and creativity through art, music and innovation.”

Translation: Baltimore is hosting a really cool art festival that features visual and performance art throughout the city, along with a conference series discussing social themes such as justice, equity, innovation, and sustainability.

The festival, which runs from March 28 through April 3, is going to be a major event for the city AND for Loyola, because Loyola is one of the sponsors.

This is going to be an amazing opportunity for Baltimore to come together and celebrate the arts, innovation, and community that is Baltimore, so make it a priority to get downtown for this festival when you can. A few things you definitely won’t want to miss…

  • The festival opens on Monday, March 28. If you’re already back on campus from Easter break that afternoon, the opening parade starts at 7 p.m.

There will be live music, floats, drum lines, and stilt walkers. I recommend planning to be back on campus as soon as you can, so that you can head downtown for this opening ceremony. Loyola students will be marching in the parade to kickoff the week’s events, and it should be really cool.

  • More than a mile of incredible light art installations: all free and open to the public every night.

From the south shore of the Inner Harbor to Harbor East, festival -goers can explore 1.5 miles of world-class installations.

lightcity

Loyola shuttles will be transporting students downtown in order to participate in this amazing festival celebrating the city all Loyola students call home (at least, our home away from home).

This is a chance for Loyola student to get off campus on a spring night and to do something cultured, something original. Light City Baltimore is the first festival of this kind in America, so it’s bound to be something you’ve never seen before. What better thing to come back to school after Easter break than a major art and music festival downtown?!

Details on Loyola Night can be found here!

  • Check out Light City’s performance, light, and music schedule for more details about what is going on each night.

Roller ballet. Dance. Human dioramas. Concerts. Music fusion. Live performance painting. Choreography around LED exhibits and fire. Yes, fire. A giant illuminated interactive puppet show. Do I need to go on?

  • You can also get more involved with the events by volunteering.

What better way to contribute to this festival than to volunteer? Light City needs a ton of volunteer help, and this is sure to be a rewarding experience.

If you can’t make it downtown for the festival, fear not…

  • Many individual neighborhoods are also participating in the magic of this event, including Hampden. So even if you can’t get all the way downtown, you can head over to Hampden or any of the other neighborhoods participation.

Check out the profiles of the different neighborhoods to see what amazing things are being done by different parts of the greater Baltimore community.

For more information on the event, visit the Light City website. Follow Light City on Facebook (event), Twitter, and Instagram. And learn how Loyola is involved with Light City!