Unexpected Encounters During Class

I remember the best day in grade school was field trip day. No matter where we were going, I knew that it was going to be an amazing day. It was a chance to get out of the classroom and learn something new, something real. It was a real change of place.

In Rome, I feel like I’m reliving this piece of my childhood.

My professors are enthusiastic about incorporating the history of the Eternal City into our lessons, discussing and analyzing the history, art, and culture of Rome. On top of all of that, our professors like to include site visits as a part of their curriculum…

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The Uffizi: Encountering the Masters

Have you ever seen the following image?

Boticelli’s “The Birth of Venus” c. 1480; Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy

I’m sure you have, probably in a textbook or on the Internet or a poster in a cafe.

But what would you do if you had the chance to see this masterpiece in person?

If you’re a nerd like me, you’d rush to see it. So that’s what my friends and I did while we were in Florence one weekend (among other things).

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From the classroom to the Forum

On Friday afternoons at Loyola, I usually head back to my room to unwind and relax after a long week of classes, homework, and extra-curricular activities.

Sometimes I have Evergreen meetings to attend, but I traditionally spend a large majority of my Friday afternoons in my room.

My traditional Friday routine was disrupted as soon as I landed in Italy. Instead of staying in my room, I found myself running around the Eternal City, or taking a bus to the train station for a weekend away…

This difference didn’t really hit me until this past weekend when, instead of heading home, my friends and I walked twenty minutes to the Markets of Trajan, which are a part of the Museum of the Imperial Fora. I willingly – and gladly! – trudged down Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, trekked across Piazza Venezia, skirted past Trajan’s Column, scurried up a flight of stairs, and entered the Museum – all on a “lazy” Friday afternoon.

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A view of Trajan’s Market from the Forum of Trajan

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The Essence of Economics

Loyola, through its community of professors, students, and alumni, allows each individual to partake in a unique academic experience, one that converts theory into reality (and vice versa).

I’m studying economics and history… and I read a book last semester that helps me to articulate the complicated and compelling reality of my academic journey.

In his book Economics: The User’s Guide, Ha-Joon Chang, an American economist, academic scholar, and professor, provides two distinct perspectives through which the broad field of Economics is interpreted, studied, and practiced.

Economics: The User's Guide by Ha-Joon Chang

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Behind the scenes: A commuter’s life

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Walking across Loyola’s campus on a beautiful day, you’re bound to see many familiar and not-yet-familiar faces. 

But even for those faces you recognize, the mystery of the characters behind them remains: their backgrounds, their goals, their pet peeves, their struggles, their ambitions.

When I walk across campus, I wave hello and engage with my professors and fellow students, and I can’t help but wonder how many of them know…

I’m a commuter student.

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#KnowMe

Greetings, all! My name is Vitaliy Nikolaenko. I am sophomore commuter student at Loyola University Maryland. Currently, I am a B.A. candidate in economics and history, a blogger for A Hound’s Life, and a contributing columnist at The Greyhound.

Born and raised in Eastern Ukraine, in the city of Kharkov, I was a boy whose fate was uncertain and whose future established great doubts. 

Years later, I would be sitting before a screen illuminating a dark, dusty study composing a brief introduction about my life’s journey as it occurred (or perhaps, describing the experiences in a more vivid, exaggerated fashion)…  

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Lessons from My Sophomore Year

The semester is finally winding down, and my second year at Loyola is coming to an end. I’ve definitely learned a bunch in my classes, but it wouldn’t be a school year at Loyola if I hadn’t learned some life lessons along the way…

While I learned Greek and read Paradise Lost, I learned how to be silent. While I wrote countless research papers and tried to learn physics, I learned patience. I met countless wonderful people and reunited with old friends.

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So, what have I learned this year that won’t receive a grade?

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An Open Letter to All High School Seniors

Euphoria.
Freedom.
Responsibility.
Stress.
Under-prepared.
Torn.
Contemplative.
Excited.
Nervous.
Joy.

These may be some of the emotions you’ve experienced this school year, first as college acceptance letters start to roll in… then as you started visiting campuses… and especially now, as you prepare to make “the big decision” and enroll.

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Celebrating Light and Life in Baltimore

We got off the bus, not really knowing what to expect, and as we walked towards the Inner Harbor, we were overwhelmed by the crowd, the music, and the lights.

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My friends and I trekked down to the Harbor for Light City on Thursday night, so we weren’t expecting too many people. It was a school night and a work night, after all. We thought we might bump into some other Loyola students, since it was “Loyola Night.”

To our surprise, there were thousands of people walking around the Inner Harbor enjoying the festival. I’ve never been so happy to see so many people in one place, all celebrating Baltimore…

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Taking a Stab at Honoring History

Each year, Loyola’s Classics students celebrate the Ides of March (March 15) by stabbing Julius Caesar on the Quad.

“Hit the brakes… THEY’RE STABBING PEOPLE ON THE QUAD?!”

Well, not quite. We reenact scenes from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar in an attempt to remember this major turning point in Roman sociopolitical history, while also reaching out to the larger Loyola community.

Let me make very clear that no one gets stabbed during this reenactment (although there was a bruised knee this year).

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