Athlete’s Prayer

God, let me play well but fairly.

Help me to learn something that matters

once the game is over.

Let compettition make me strong but never hostile.

Always let me help my opponent up.

Never catch me rejoicing in the adversity of others.

If I know victory, allow me to be happy; if I am denied, keep

me from envy.

Remind me that sports are just games.

If through athletics I set an example,

let it be a good one.

-Unknown

“If we play our best, we’re gonna run them off the field,” Biff said, not in a cocky way, just being factual. “And when we beat them, I want you yo have the same kind of class we had last year. I don’t want guys taking their jerseys off and running all over the place. You know, be respectful.” And if DeMatha were to somehow come out ahead? “I want you going straight over and shaking their hands,” Biff said.

-Jeffrey Marx, Season of Life

Prayer to Play Fair in the Game of Life

Dear Lord, in the struggle that goes on through life

We ask for a field that is fair,

A chance that is equal with all the strife,

The courage to strive and to dare;

And if we should win, let it be by the code,

With our faith and our honor held high;

And if we should lose, let us stand by the road

And cheer as the winners go by.

-Knute Rockne

“The second criteria…for masculinity…is that all of us ought to have some kind of cause, some kind of purpose in our lives, that’s bigger than our own individual hopes, dreams, wants, and desires. At the end of our life, we ought to be able to look back over it from our deathbed and know that somehow the world was a better place because we lived, we loved, we were other-centered, other-focused.”

-Jeffrey Marx, Season of Life

Jesuit Examen

What have been the high points of my life?

What have been the low points of my life?

Have I ever felt like God was trying to tell me something?

Who are the people that have loved me for who I really am?

What did I learn today?

What gives me the greatest happiness?

What experiences made me who I am today?

Whom did I neglect?

Where did I neglect myself?

What did I do today for the poor and excluded?

Where could I have taken a risk and tried something different?

Who have been my heroes?

What did I learn about God from my family?

Who in my life is an example of courage?

Who is most valuable to me?

What have been the most fun experiences of my life?

What are my talents, and how have I used them?

Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid. Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house. Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.

Matthew 5:14-16

 

The Inner Game of Tennis

A phenomenon when first published in 1972, the Inner Game was a real revelation. Instead of serving up technique, it concentrated on the fact that, as Gallwey wrote, “Every game is composed of two parts, an outer game and an inner game.” The former is played against opponents, and is filled with lots of contradictory advice; the latter is played not against, but within the mind of the player, and its principal obstacles are self-doubt and anxiety. Gallwey’s revolutionary thinking, built on a foundation of Zen thinking and humanistic psychology, was really a primer on how to get out of your own way to let your best game emerge. It was sports psychology before the two words were pressed against each other and codified into an accepted discipline.

Available on Amazon!

Lucky Every Day

In the bestselling tradition of Ten Things I Wish I’d Known….and The Right Words at the Right Time comes a collection of inspirational wisdom from beloved lacrosse coach, the late Diane Geppi-Aikens.

Loyola College of Maryland Women’s Lacrosse Coach Diane Geppi-Aikens would have been a remarkable role model simply as one of the nation’s top lacrosse coaches. But this single mother of four battled inoperable brain tumors for eight years. Partially paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair, Geppi-Aikens missed only one game as she coached her #1 ranked team into the semi-finals of the NCAA championships. In spite of the terrible tragedy threatening her life, she managed to get her players to consider her lucky. Now, in the wake of this courageous woman’s death comes an incredibly inspirational book. In 20 short chapters, Geppi-Aikens’s unique and uplifting teachings live on through the memories of those she inspired most.

By: Chip Silverman

Available on Amazon!

Big Questions Worthy Dreams

Building on the foundation she established with her ground-breaking book, The Critical Years, Parks invites us to take up responsibility for providing thoughtful mentorship and mentoring environments during the wilderness years of young adulthood. In this updated edition she addresses recent current events: violence in our culture, smart phones, mixed spirituality/religious identities, social media/networking, the economic crisis, changing racial identity, cultural shifts and other forces shaping the narrative of young adulthood today. She provides concrete ways of employing the theory in different types of mentoring communities, more on the relationship between meaning-making (faith/religion/spirituality) and disciplinary learning and includes new (and more timely) stories and illustrations.

By: Sharon Daloz Parks

Available on Amazon!

Everyone Leads

Praise for Everyone Leads

“If America is going to continue to thrive in the twenty-first century, we must strengthen our sense of community. In Everyone Leads, Schmitz lays out the challenges for those of us who have a passion to make a difference and, more important, the strategies to spark lasting change from the grassroots up. His unique perspective and experience make this a must-read for community activists.”—Geoffrey Canada, president and CEO, Harlem Children’s Zone

“This moment in history demands that we stop waiting for others—especially others living in Washington, D.C.—to solve the problems and right the wrongs of our times. Now, more than ever, we must mine the most underutilized resource available to us: We the People. Everyone Leads shows us how.”—Arianna Huffington, president and executive editor, Huffington Post Media Group

“Social change has always come from the leadership of the many, not the few. Everyone Leads shows us how we can all step up and contribute to social change.”—Tavis Smiley, author, broadcaster, philanthropist

“Every nonprofit can learn from Public Allies’ example that the leadership we need to solve problems exists within our communities. Everyone Leads is a guide to inclusion, collaboration, and community building that will inspire readers to see leadership and opportunity in places we don’t usually look.”—Sterling Speirn, CEO, W.K. Kellogg Foundation

“Schmitz has produced the road map we need for this ‘all hands on deck’ moment when we need a new spirit of collaborative leadership and action to face the problems of our day. Reading this book, we are not surprised that Michelle Obama learned from Public Allies how to build leaders and build communities.”—Harris Wofford, former United States Senator, and CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service under President Bill Clinton

By: Paul Schmitz

Available on Amazon!

Onward

In 2008, Howard Schultz decided to return as the CEO of Starbucks to help restore its financial health and bring the company back to its core values. In Onward, he shares this remarkable story, revealing how, during one of the most tumultuous economic periods in American history, Starbucks again achieved profitability and sustainability without sacrificing humanity.

In this #1 New York Times bestseller, the CEO of Starbucks recounts the story and leadership lessons behind the global coffee company’s comeback.

By: Howard Schultz

Available on Amazon!

Diary

Susan Cheever observed in a New York Times Book Review appraisal of his memoir Down from Troy that Richard Selzer “cares more about truth than consequences . . . [and] immerses us in the facts we all know but hate to admit.” Selzer’s Diary picks up roughly where the memoir leaves off, as his writing life flourishes and surgical career ends. Stripped of the doctor-writer’s “privilege of [walking] about all day in the middle of a short story,” Selzer shifts his focus to his interior life. In Diary, the author’s successes and regrets, as well as the humor and sadness that surround him, are revealed with the same empathy and vividness that made him one of the great doctor-writers of modern literature.

Diary brings together stories and observations dashed off on park benches and in library carrels over the past decade. Following the success of such books asConfessions of a Knife and The Doctor Stories, Selzer’s diary entries recount life lived in the shadow of both achievement and disappointment. He introduces a varied cast of characters, from the distinguished fellowship of the “Boys Friendly” to his “fellow loonies,” and evokes the streets, buildings, and parks of Yale and New Haven with vibrancy and affection. And throughout, Selzer faces the looming specter of old age. The distinctive voice that paved the way for other notable doctor-writers like Jerome Groopman and Abraham Verghese is revealed here to be no less compelling with the spotlight turned on himself and the drama of everyday living.

By: Richard Selzer

Available on Amazon!