A Year Ago Today

Maybe, one day, I’ll travel around the world.
Maybe, one day, I’ll write a book!
Maybe, one day, I’ll climb a mountain so I can get a new perspective on life.
Maybe, one day, I’ll do everything I’ve ever dreamed of.
Maybe, one day…

All of these “Maybes” are what keep me going in life. There are so many possibilities and directions my life can take, so many day dreams just waiting to unfold. Ok, so maybe I’m a little scared at the prospect of all these options, but overall I have a more positive outlook than last year.

A year ago today I published my last blog post of sophomore year. When I think about how I felt at that time, what was going on in my life, where I thought I was going, all of the “Maybes” and questions I didn’t know how to answer, I can’t help but realize how much of that has changed.

I spent an unforgettable semester abroad soaking up the culture and history of Ireland while meeting some amazing people along the way. I learned so much, both intellectually and about myself. Art, music, literature, history, people, those are my passions. Thirteen museums, a multitude of books, one hand-sewn cloak, countless hours with newly made friends, and over 3000 photos later I’m back home wishing it had never ended. Sometimes all of it feels like a dream, so vivid and yet already so far away.

I’ve mentioned before how I have a better sense of direction, how I now have a (vague) sense of what I want to do with my life. And it’s true, I do. Taking communications courses has created so many more possibilities for my creative endeavors, to such an extent that I’m interning for Loyola’s Communication department on the Timonium campus next fall! (Woo! I’m super excited!)

Oh man, next fall…is going to be interesting. I’m taking 6 courses, a good mix of comm, art, and, ready for this? Morals and Politics of Lord of the Rings. Yep, that’s right. You know when you flip through course catalogues at college admissions offices and you see all the cool courses like “Scandalous Victorians” or “Global Macho: Race, Gender and Action Movies” and you’re like, Oh boy! I can’t wait to take that! But then you get to college and find out those are only upper levels or the professor who taught them is on sabbatical or the courses simply aren’t offered anymore. So you can imagine my geeky joy when I found out Loyola was offering such a course and I got one of the last spots in the class. As demanding as my course load will be, I’m still looking forward to the beginning of my senior year.

How can I be thinking of next year when this one has barely ended?

Great question! I don’t know, to be honest. Call it procrastination, or stress induced hallucinations, or the basic excitement for what’s to come. All I know is that next year contains a whole lot of “Maybes” waiting for me to make them into definite eventualities. And I have to admit, that’s a tantalizing prospect.

And so I bid you adieu, fair readers. May all your wanderings, wherever you are, be fruitful, happy, and full of adventure! Have a great summer!

Thanks for the Memories

Well, I’m back! Yes, the Evergreen campus is my home once more, and I have a feeling this semester is going to be pretty sweet. I spent the past two days in running pants and oversized t-shirts while writing, reading, arting, knitting, and planning for the next week or so. A comfortable and quiet weekend. It’s a nice buffer to the crazy weekdays.

But why does this even matter? Well, the chilling out time has allowed me to think about the past semester. Aaaand also think about what’s to come. You know, like, those questions everyone keeps asking me “What do you want to do with your life?” “What are your plans after you graduate?” (UGH) If you couldn’t tell, I don’t have the answers to those two questions. But I do have the opportunity to thank Loyola for the following Highlights of 2013.

The first thing I have to say thank you for is giving me the opportunity to explore. Not just Baltimore (although that’s pretty great). But also myself. For the past year, mainly through this blog I might add, I’ve been discovering new aspects of myself I hadn’t realized were there. Or maybe I knew they might be there, but I hadn’t taken any steps to access them. Loyola gave me the chance to write freely, in different styles, about unexpected topics, and without fear that my views would be mocked or rejected.

My second thank you goes out to the school’s faculty. This is probably the most obvious acknowledgment, but one that is very necessary. You challenge me to excel, and you expect nothing less than growth and improvement. Thank goodness. Because sometimes I lose my sense of motivation, and remembering the professors who said “You can do better” gets me out of bed and back to my desk (yes, I am very competitive with myself).

Perhaps this is also fairly obvious, but, well, to all my friends: You. Are. The. Best. And Loyola, thank you for hooking me up with them via the Alpha (now Messina) program, clubs, convenient lunch times, classes, and being a beautiful campus that everyone wants to be part of. You guys (and you know who you are) put up with so much of my crazy and I am so lucky to have you as part of my life. For those of you who may not know what this “crazy” is, I still say thank you for being part of my life, no matter how infrequently I get to see you!

And finally, thank you, Loyola, for sending me abroad. Last semester was…unbelievable. People say studying abroad changes you, but I didn’t realize how true that was until I returned. I’ve seen so many new places (and I can’t wait to see more), I’ve found out so much about myself, and I’ve met so many people I would never have encountered if I had stayed here. I’ve become more independent, organized, thoughtful, and open to new experiences. If someone told 13-year-old-me what I would be doing now, who I would become, I wouldn’t believe them. I don’t think even 18-year-old-me would quite believe it.

So where does this leave me? A little nostalgic, going through all those posts to find ones that I could link. But also excited. I’m 21, in a fantastic city, at an excellent school, with amazing people – I’m in control of my life. I have the power to say yes or no, to try new things, to choose where my life is headed. And to all of my fellow Greyhounds reading this: You have it, too. So get excited. Take your highlights from the past year and turn them into something spectacular.

A Weekend Filled with (Dutch) History

As I’m writing this, snow is falling gently, adding to the afternoon’s quiet peacefulness. My ‘balsam & cedar’ candle makes the aura of Christmas even more pronounced, in case you missed the wrapping paper and ribbons lying on the floor. Oh, and don’t forget the Christmas Jazz I’ve been listening to.

You could say I’ve settled into being home quite pleasantly. (The clothes I washed yesterday already have cat hair on them. Oh yes, I’m home.

But, as much as I would love to expound on the advantages to being home early for the Christmas season, what I really planned to write about was my…(drum roll please) Trip to Amsterdam!

You have no idea how psyched I was to find out the art history course I took at UCC included an optional trip to the Dutch capital. So excited in fact, that I bought my plane ticket before the trip was fully confirmed by my professor. Which of course guaranteed that not enough people from the class signed up to go and I was left with the (slightly terrifying) circumstance of traveling to  a foreign country the day after Thanksgiving by myself. Luckily Erin swooped in and offered to come with me, which made the weekend all the more fun and adventurous.

I need to point something out that I’ve noticed since traveling during this semester:

Europe is old. Compared to the US at least. I mean, you hear that all the time, but you don’t really get it until you stay in a hostel whose building is 400 years old. Or you walk out of a 19th century train station to gape at the surrounding buildings that look like real life gingerbread houses (but more sophisticated). Really.

For example, one of the many opera houses of Amsterdam:

The Rijksmuseum:

A shopping mall:

But getting past that phenomenal architecture to the contents of those buildings. Amsterdam is a city filled with history, and to keep track of it all, there are over 50 museums. Erin and I only made it to 5, but oh man, it was an experience.

The first one we went to was the Diamond Museum – I had no idea Amsterdam has such a history with the precious stones. It was really cool to see them being cut (at Coster Diamonds) and then learn about the whole mining and development process. The museum also had some pretty nifty displays:

Yes, that is indeed Van Gogh’s Starry Night with diamonds glittering in the sky. Speaking of Van Gogh, the museum dedicated to him is a must-see. Yes, I am a huge fan, but even the casual museum-goer would enjoy the rooms bursting with color, expression, and would gain a better understanding of the man behind the brushstrokes. On Friday nights they even have live music and are open till 10!

One of my favorite museums I went during my time abroad would have to the Rijksmuseum, which Erin and I visited the following day. I of course took the obligatory picture in front of the “I amsterdam” sculpture:

The museum is beautiful both inside and out and filled with amazing treasures:

The Netherlands have a rich trade history, hence the room full of model ships.

It's so simple and elegant!

 

The streets of Amsterdam are filled with unexpected delights, like street artists doing their thing:

Dutch waffle shops:

Stores like the “Otherist” featuring truly other-worldly object like preserved insects, fancy briefcases, pre-WWII glass eyes, truly unique salt and pepper shakers, and art prints of Cthulhu-like creatures (sorry, no pictures).

Erin and I also went to the Tulip Museum (very small), and a canal tour at night, and on my final day I visited the Amsterdam Museum which offered a very comprehensive history of the city with fun, interactive displays. But that was after I took a nice morning stroll around the quiet streets and went to Mass:

Dutch aged cheddar cheese is Mm-mm, perfect!

Tulip market

Art market

 

The church I went to Mass at - gorgeous inside!

 

I think Amsterdam was one of my favorite cities so far, even though trying to pronounce a language with words that have 10 consonants and 3 vowels is pretty difficult (and embarrassing). Despite the cold, I’d really love to go back. All that art and history right at your fingertips, yum!

The Beginning of the End (or not?)

Hello again! I know it’s been forever since I’ve written, and I really do apologize. Between the experience of celebrating Thanksgiving in a different country, to visiting Amsterdam, to writing two 4,000 word papers (that’s about 15 pages, double spaced) and getting through two exams, it’s been a bit busy here. Not to mention the usual adventures in Cork with my friends.

Originally, I was planning to write this on the plane ride back to the States, but the weather seems to be conspiring against me – my flight was one of thousands to be cancelled due to the snow storm blowing through the east coast this weekend. To be fair, it isn’t too pleasant here, either. As I’m writing this the wind is howling through the alleyway, pushing up against my window and seemingly trying to get into my room to introduce me to its new best friend, Sideways Rain.

So now I have an extra day to reflect on my time here, to ponder over my experiences, and to share some sort of insight with you.

Honestly, that scares me a little.

I’m not…I’m not ready to leave yet. Or rather, I’m not ready to leave permanently. I’m kind of excited to go back home: to see my family and friends, to enjoy the snow (instead of rain), to snuggle with my cats, to read my leisure books, to sleep without an alarm, to knit, to, to…to do everything.

Don’t get me wrong, I would love to do those things here, too. But a little bit of home would be nice. Especially a little bit Baltimore, because I’m really missing that right now.

But back to that ‘scary’ part.

I think a large part of me doesn’t want to sit down and analyze my time here because that would mean it’s “over.” It would mean accepting that I may never come back and see all the amazing people I’ve met and become friends with. It would mean fully realizing I’m almost 3/4 through college and have more questions than answers about my future. Studying abroad has given me so many more possibilities to think about, not just in regards to traveling outside the US, but also to where I see myself in the future (I’ve been toying with the idea of Washington and Oregon).

So maybe I’m not totally ready for a tell-all blog post. Give me a week or two to filter and adjust – then I will be. In lieu of that, I propose a few other posts to break up the introspection:

  1. Adventures in Amsterdam! SO MANY PICTURES. Really. It’s an amazing city.
  2. 10 Things I’m going to miss from Ireland
  3. 10 things I learned from study abroad

I look forward to writing again over the next week!

(Insert London Reference Here)

This morning I amused my roommate to no end by trying to speak. And by trying to speak, I mean croak out an explanation of the communications project I was working on, only to have my voice break half way through a sentence and cause Julia to chortle into her coffee.

Yes, it is indeed that time of year again. The common cold creeps upon unsuspecting victims whose weary immune systems are vulnerable after weeks of personal stress, upcoming final papers, and a weekend excursion to London.

I think it was really that last bit that brought me down with the sniffles, but I don’t regret it one bit! London was…London was beautiful. London was filled with adventures, from strolling through Hyde Park and Baker Street to seeing the Crown Jewels in the Tower. London doesn’t feel like home, as Ireland does, but it fills me with possibility and wonder and joy and great expectations.

I’m afraid I have to say that London beats Paris. Because let’s face it, the following experiences I’m about to share with you will always bring a smile to my face.

As previously mentioned, Hyde Park and Baker Street were our first stops in the city, after quickly figuring out the London Underground of course (it actually isn’t that difficult – it’s way more straightforward than NYC). A brisk stroll through the park brought us to the construction of a winter carnival, which my friends and I got super excited about until we realized they wouldn’t be opening till next week. Bummer. But, we did manage to enjoy a beautiful sunset on the Serpentine!

Our quest for 221B Baker Street proved to be unfruitful, however, as the actual set where productions of Sherlock Holmes is elsewhere in the city. But, we did come across a Beatles paraphernalia shop which was oddly appropriate for the next day’s adventure to Abbey Road.

After witnessing an undercover cop chase down a man in handcuffs, we decided to head over to the Tower, eating a breakfast of baguette sandwiches along the way.

As you can see, we couldn’t have asked for better weather, the sun gracing us with warmth and beautiful lighting for shots of Tower Bridge.

It was really cool to walk around in a place filled with so much history. Just think of all the kings, visitors, and yes, prisoners, who came there through the centuries! We saw so much: the Crown Jewels, the armory, the minting process, the King Edward I’s bed chambers, gargoyles galore, and of course the ravens! (btw, I had no idea they were so big)

Our day continued to follow a historical theme as we made our way to the Globe Theater after winding our way through the London streets. This, I think, was Erin’s favorite part of the trip. I mean, walking past this:

to get to this:

had her jumping with joy. I know, I know, the Globe actually burned down centuries ago, but the theater that stands there today is historically accurate, even down to the method of construction! Our guide even told us that audiences still stand to see the plays, and participation (within reason) is allowed, just like during Shakespeare’s day. I would love to be a part of that someday, to be such an active viewer of one of his works.

I seriously thought my day couldn’t get much better, I mean, seeing historical places, right? Well, being the foodie I am, my evening rocked compared to the daytime activities. Rocked as in That was one of the best meals of my life ever. Hunger may be the best sauce, but add a little wine, good friends, and a delicious desert, and you’ve got the makings of a feast. I ate what was possibly the best fish n chips of my life, followed by sharing a desert platter of chocolatey goodness and raspberry peach cobbler (with apple sorbet!). Looking around the table at my friends, sharing in their laughter and good spirits is a memory I will always cherish.

To top off the evening (and walk off desert), we set off to view Big Ben, the Eye, and the Houses of Parliament in all their lighted glory. We also came across a telephone booth, and yes, we took the obligatory tourist pictures!


Despite coming down with a cold, London was truly an amazing experience and I sincerely hope I can return someday.

*Stay tuned next week for my day adventure in Cardiff!

Short and Sweet

There are a few things I’d like to say before presenting the topic of this post:

  1. While studying abroad generally allows traveling to many new places, it doesn’t mean it happens every week.
  2. Ireland’s system of only 1-2 exams/papers as assessment holds all students responsible for pacing themselves and not going crazy when they have multiple papers due the same day as their group flight to Paris.
  3. By the 2nd month of studying abroad, you start to miss stupid things about the US, like peanut butter and easy mac (even if you can cook (healthier) homemade mac n cheese).

What I’m trying to say is: Classes have fallen into a routine and I’m not always doing something spectacular on weekends which is why I feel like I don’t have a lot to share with you and therefore don’t write as much.

*dramatic gasp for air after run-on sentence*

Ssssooo…..I plan to make it up to you guys by sharing the plethora of photos I have over a number of shorter posts. This way you guys get to see what I’ve been up to in detail and won’t get bored with my longer ramblings. One of which will be coming soon! Next week! On…some subject that I haven’t come up with yet!

But back to the topic at hand: Photo Recap!

This set of photos goes back to August, the first weekend I arrived in Ireland, when the Loyola group went to Barryscourt Castle and Midleton.

Barryscourt Castle Walls

Barryscourt Cottage and Gardens

Feast Hall - Complete with goblets and trenchers!

Great Hall Curtains - Lord's & Lady's chambers behind them

Medieval Kitchen Supplies

 

Baby's Crib

Medieval Gardens

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet

Thistle

 

Jameson Distillery, No worries, I'm 21!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Distillery Equipment

 

Jameson Sign Post

 

Jameson Waterwheel

 

Jameson Casks

 

Jameson Bell

 

So pretty....

 

Rose Petals

 

A bee!

 

So It Begins (In Ireland!)

There’s something about enjoying food and drink with one of your best friends while watching a hurling game. Maybe it’s just the food (and drink), maybe it’s just my friend’s enthusiasm, maybe it’s just a break from studying for tomorrow’s exam, but whatever it is, I like it.

Me and ErinIf you’re wondering what on earth I’m talking about, because yeah, it’s been forever (OK, so only 5 months), time for a few updates!

  1. I’m officially installed in Cork, Ireland for my semester abroad!
  2. My Early Start in Archeology is almost over (!!!) – hence the exam on Monday.
  3. The summer was pretty cool, but this school year is going to be AWESOME.

The past 3 weeks have flown by. I’ve seen so much, read so much, and just absorbed everything. Visiting a different country is one thing, but living in a different country is so much more complex (and beautiful).

In some ways, living in Ireland isn’t any different from living at home. I’m in my own apartment, I have to buy groceries and cook, and I have a decent walk to classes. Then again, some things are very different. I’m in a single bedroom with only one other roommate (from Dusseldorf), there is no such thing as bulk shopping and food spoils faster because there are fewer preservatives so I have to shop weekly, and it’s a 20-minute walk to campus. Maybe 15 if you have long legs.

Regardless of the differences, I love it here. I feel like I fit in fairly easily, and except for the American accent I’ve been taken for a local a few times. The Irish are very friendly and helpful if you’re a bit lost, and I’ve never seen a more diverse cuisine in restaurants. When it comes down to being comfortable and safe, I can actually call it home.

Yes, I do miss Loyola a bit, especially last week when everyone was posting statuses on Facebook about move-in. Luckily I’ve got a good friend base started here, and I’m sure that once classes begin next week and societies and clubs start up I’ll be very busy and not missing seeing people from home as much.

UCC Main QuadSpeaking of classes, in case you’re wondering what’s involved in an archeology course and why I would be interested in taking one, here are some of the (super cool) things my class got to see and do.

We visited Trim Castle in Co. Meath

Trim Castle

and Newgrange, the oldest Megalithic tomb.

Newgrange

We also saw the High Crosses of Monasterboice,

High Cross

and Christ Church in Dublin.

Christ Church

Another field trip focused on West Cork, where we saw the Garrannes Ringfort, Ballinacarriga Tower House, and Coppinger’s Court, and the Drombeg Stone Circle.

This kind of gives you an idea of the ring-effectTowerhouse

Coppinger's CourtStone Circle

Our most recent field trip was to North Cork. There we saw (and climbed in) the Labbacallee Wedge Tomb and toured the Rock of Cashel, a truly impressive medieval church.

Wedge TombCashel

I realize that was probably an overload of information, but now that I’ve started blogging again I’m going to keep posts about my adventures more focused.

For now though, I have to go back to studying, and try to get over Cork being tied with Clare for the final!

*Note: For more posts and pictures about my travels in Ireland, please visit roryroamingthegreenhills.tumblr.com.

Sisters, Friends, and Study Abroad

I think I made what is to be one of my favorite college memories last night. It was one of those moments when you can step out of yourself and say “This. This is what I’m living for. And I don’t want it to end.” Of course it does, but now you have a snapshot of that one particular moment with that one particular set of feelings and that one particular smile of pure contentment playing on your lips.

Before I tell you what it was that had me loving life, I should probably give you some context before you think all I do is cook and partake in other house-wifey duties. I should also mention that this relates to my future plans for next year.

I know I’ve written that I have a sister, Curran, but I don’t think you know much more other than there’s 13 years between us and she is now raising a beautiful family with her husband Tim in Massachusetts. I didn’t get to visit her very frequently during high school, and I get to even less now that I’m in Maryland. However, since starting college, I’ve begun the practice of visiting her for about a week in the summer and winter. Those visits are truly a change of scene that I wouldn’t give up for the world.

In the winter we sit in front of a crackling fire and sip hot cider while reading books after the kids have gone to bed. In the summer we go to children’s museums in the day and concerts in the park at night. But no matter the season we always cook together. Curran has her own garden and a farm share to supply fresh vegetables and herbs; I swear it tastes different from what you buy in the store. When we start a recipe from her arsenal of cookbooks, I always end up learning something new about the art of cooking. From a faster way to chop onions to the proper order of making pesto, she makes these lessons family memories.

This is due in part to the conversations we have and the music we listen to, but the best thing we share during these bonding sessions is Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me. Yes, I know, I’ve mentioned it before, but it’s something that has become a family past time. As we mince garlic and wash lettuce, we try to guess the Listener Limerick and always have a good laugh when Paula Poundstone is on the show.

And as of last night, I was able to share this experience with my roommate Erin. After an exhausting week we wanted to keep our Friday night relaxing, so I made homemade spaghetti sauce with fettuccine for dinner. Instead of playing my usual cooking playlist and dancing along, or Erin watching Doctor Who in our bedroom, we enjoyed each others’ company in the kitchen. And listened to Wait Wait.

As I stirred the sauce, I looked over to see Erin laughing at Peter Sagal’s commentary while playing her 3DS, the warm light creating a comforting glow, and our future dinner filling the room with a tantalizing aroma. That’s when it happened. That moment of happiness: a sense of belonging based on the trust of friendship and the sharing of interests.

Now, as to how this could possibly have anything to do with my future plans, well…next semester Erin and I are embarking on an adventure. We’ll be leaving family and friends (though I’m sure we’ll make some new ones) to study abroad in Cork, Ireland! We’ve agreed not to be direct roommates for that time, but it’s reassuring to know she’ll still be there with me. To say I’m excited to share new experiences and make new memories would be the biggest understatement of the year. I am beyond excited.

I am impassioned, thrilled, wild, ecstatic; basically every possible adjective that could express happiness at this wonderful opportunity to learn about a new culture and make some amazing memories with one of my good friends.

Oh The Places I’ll Go (I Hope)!

Possibly one of the most gratifying and terrifying experiences in college is handing in your Declaration of Major paperwork.

See, deciding what you’re going to do for the next two and a half years doesn’t just mean choosing courses. It also means studying abroad, internships, and how to make yourself wanted, no, needed, by employers.

But let’s forget that super scary stuff and focus on the tantalizing idea of leaving the country. I have a map on my wall (you may have seen it, but not in detail) of all the places I’ve been and all the places I want to go.

So many places to see! And yes, I have a lot of buttons.

Focusing on Europe Yellow - States Traveled; Red - Countries Traveled; Blue/Green - Unexplored

Focusing on EuropeAs you can see, there are quite a few places I want to visit. I read about them in history books, hear about them on Rick Steve’s Travels in Europe, and see them in National Geographic Magazine. I don’t just want to visit, or spend a whirlwind 10 days driving across a country. I really want to absorb the culture: meet the locals, find the forgotten nooks and crannies, connect with the landscape, eat new foods, and just experience life in a different place.

There’s just so much you can learn from people with different experiences from your own.
So without further ado, I will share with you my hopes and daydreams of the inexperienced.

(All photos from this point onward are courtesy of National Geographic and their wonderful photographers)

Iceland

SO PRETTY

Eyjafjallajokull Volcano

Because who wouldn’t want to combine insane heat with insane cold? But really, it’s beautiful there.

England – London: Home of Shakespeare, Sherlock Holmes, and so many more inspirational people.

Norway

Norway Forest

Kongsvinger Forest, bit of a hike from Oslo

This is the perfect combination of the Forbidden Forest and Mirkwood. It looks more friendly though!

France – Paris: The Louvre + Art Student = Happiness

Kazahkstan

Astana

Astana

I picked up an NG magazine in the dentist’s office once and bright colors bombarded my eyes, so of course I had to learn more about it. Apparently this is their new capital, very shiny.

Greece – Thessaloniki: Have I mentioned how much I like lamb and baklava?

Morocco

Casablanca Mosque

Casablanca, Hasan II Mosque

Yes, I love the movie. But the culture is so colorful I’d have to stay a week to absorb it all.

Denmark – Kronborg Castle: I’m a huge history/lit enthusiast. So if I’m given the opportunity to visit the castle where Hamlet was set, you can bet I’ll be psyched.

Finland

Finland Sky

By Muoino

That. I want to see that. Stars and light and space. All open. For everyone.

New Zealand - I think I’d have to go all over the island because 1) It’s gorgeous, and 2) Lord of the Rings was filmed all over.

Egypt

Luxor Temple

Luxor

I’m not a huge hot weather person, but seeing those temples and pyramids would be fantastic. To have something towering over you that is so ancient and strong is spectacular.

Scotland – Edinburgh: There are seven (seven!!!) art fests in the summer and just think of all the fresh wool!

Turkey

Istanbul

Istanbul

So maybe I just want to go so I can sing this song by They Might Be Giants. Just kidding!

Australia – I’d have to see Melbourne, but koalas, kangaroos, penguins, and red rocks are at the top of the must-see list.

Madagascar

Boababs

Avenue of the Boababs

Between The Little Prince and Zaboomafoo memories of my childhood, I’d say seeing this island beats the Bahamas.

Ireland - ALL OVER.

It’s weird how I say the least about the place I want to go to most. If I could only go to one country on this list (and there are more pins on the map than countries listed), it would be Ireland. I’ll save my reasoning for my Study Abroad application, I don’t want to give them any spoilers!