Don’t Get Tripped up on the True-False Waltz

True-false questions can seem like a deceptively simple two-option answer. Here are a few tricks to make sure you don’t misstep:

  • As long as there is no guessing penalty, try to make an educated guess. Leaving a blank would be criminal. After all, you have a 50% chance of being right!
  • Words such as “always,” “never” and “every” indicate that a statement must be true all of the time. These types of words usually lead to an answer of “false.”
  • Words such as “sometimes,” “generally,” and “usually” mean that, depending on the situation, the statement can be true or false. Such words frequently result in an answer of “true.”
  • Most true-false tests have more true answers than false answers. So if you’re at the end of the true-false section and you feel like you bombed it, go back and count. What’s your true to false ratio? If you have more false than true answers, you may want to go back and revise the answers about which you are unsure.
  • If there is any part of a statement that is false, then the whole statement is false. HOWEVER, just because a portion of the statement is true, does not mean that the whole statement is true. Got it?

Want more helpful Test-taking Tips? Take a workshop at The Study!

Photo Credit:
http://vienna.metblogs.com/archives/images/2006/11/waltz.gif
http://ezruby.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/true-false.jpg

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